Spring Report-The Green Hills Garden

After this past,vicious winter, I did not expect to see many survivors other than the wildflowers planted by the owner, the iris, and the peonies.

In some cases, I was proved right.

In others, I was proved surprised.

No surprise that a venerable rosemary,planted against a sunny south facing stone foundation, was killed outright when the temperature went from 70 to almost 0 in 24 hours. I do not think there was a rosemary in the city alive after that, and indeed the rosemary patch out on River Road at the Green Door Gourmet was a graveyard.

Also lost in the Green Hills garden were half the Gregg’s Salvias, although the larger plants with more wood on them are coming back from the roots.

I did not expect Salvia leucantha, or Wendy’s Wish Salvia to live. Nor did I expect to see three Indigo Spires Salvias coming back from the roots, which they are , with vigor. I have only seen this salvia survive one winter in all my years of gardening, so this is astonishing

And “Phyllis Fancy” listed as Zone 7 in the Plant Delights catalog, is ,alas, a winter non-doer. Dave’s Garden website says it is Zone 10, and I believe it, but it is such an excellent plant that who could resist replacing it-

Also alive is Salvia Darcyi, shown here-

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And here are the crinums, now more than 20 years old, returning.

 

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A tree peony in the herb garden-

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Columbines, self-seeded, under a dogwood. Followed by Golden Ragwort along the front walk.

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Two spring annuals that have been returning for over thirty years. Larkspur and the old timey Bachelor’s buttons. Both will bloom in May.ImageImageImage

 

Other plants of note that survived:

Cestrum “Orange Peel”. Coming back strong from the roots. It may reach 6 ft this season.

Verbena bonariensis

Erythina Bidwidii- green at the base and alive.

 

This year I plan to fill in these borders with Gomphrena (“Fire Works”, “Las Vegas Purple”, and “Strawberry Fields”), with Wheat Celosias, Salvia cocinea,Mexican zinnias, and Tithonia the Mexican Sunflower.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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About talesofanashvillegardener

Professional gardener, Experimental Cook. Constant Reader
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